Tag Archives: vinyl

Rocks In The Attic #673: The Beach Boys – ‘Holland’ (1973)

RITA#673If there was ever a band that was stuck in time, like an insect trapped in the sap of a tree, it’s the Beach Boys. They were the hippest American band between 1962’s Surfin’ Safari and 1966’s Pet Sounds – or more specifically between 1962’s Surfin’ Safari single and 1966’s Good Vibrations. Then Brian stepped back and things changed.

Don’t get me wrong, I love records like Surf’s Up and this, their 1973 album, Holland – but it’s not California Girls, is it? Without Brian Wilson’s input on this record – aside from a couple of token writing credits including a 7” fairytale EP in the vein of Nilsson’s The Point! (although nowhere near as charming) – the Beach Boys seem lost at sea. If you close your eyes, you can almost imagine them being a band on their own merits, without the genius of Brian, but then you hear those harmonies and you’re instantly reminded of Help Me Rhonda or I Get Around.

The band even looks out of place when you see them in colour around this period – on stage in multi-coloured satin shirts or in white suits. They seem forever to be locked into the antiseptic cleanliness of mid-‘60s teen television, grooving against white infinity screens alongside bikini-clad dancing girls.

Hit: Sail On, Sailor

Hidden Gem: The Trader


Rocks In The Attic #672: Various Artists – ‘More Pennies From Heaven (O.S.T.)’ (1979)

RITA#672.jpgI think I might be reincarnated from some 1930’s Big Band musician or something; this kind of music really resonates with me for some reason. I always get the same feeling of intense familiarity when I hear Hang Out The Stars In Indiana from the Withnail & I soundtrack.

Either that, or I was asleep in my cot while my Mum & Dad watched this show after I was born in 1978. That sounds more believable I guess, with the old-timey music seeping into my DNA as they watched Bob Hoskins on the telly.

Hit: Cheek To Cheek – Lew Stone & His Band

Hidden Gem: Down Sunnyside Lane – Jack Payne & His BBC Dance Orchestra

Rocks In The Attic #670: Alan Moorhouse – ‘Beatles, Bach, Bacharach Go Bossa’ (1971)

RITA#670This is a lovely little slice of lounge music, not a million miles away from the camp shtick you might find on the first Austin Powers soundtrack. My wife finds records like these in the charity shop, and 9 times out of 10 they’re always worth a listen to.

The liner notes for this MFP release, by Bill Wellings, promise that ‘The four Beatles numbers (including George Harrison’s Something) are already well known to you, but they sound really fresh and inviting in their smart new Brazilian style.’ I guess you know you’ve made it when your songs are reworked into a musical style from another continent.

‘So, if your party ever looks like sagging in the middle, switch on to the Beatles, Bach & Bacharach in Bossa Beat – and give the party a swingin’ new lease of life!’

Hit: Yesterday

Hidden Gem: Air On A G String


Rocks In The Attic #669: Various Artists – ‘Stand By Me (O.S.T.)’ (1986)

RITA#669There were a number of films released through the 1980s which went some way in redefining the seminal singles of the 1950s and 1960s. Lawrence Kasdan’s The Big Chill kicked off the nostalgia in 1983, before Rob Reiner’s Stand By Me and Oliver Stone’s Platoon landed in 1986. By the time of 1988’s Good Morning Vietnam, it was almost commonplace for a Hollywood film to feature a ‘golden oldies’ soundtrack.

Along the more obvious hits on this soundtrack – Buddy Holly’s Everyday, Jerry Lee Lewis’ Great Balls Of Fire, and of course, Ben E. King’s Stand By Me – there’s one very interesting addition. The Del-Viking’s Come Go With Me might sound like any other late-‘50s R&B, but it was actually the song that a teenage Paul McCartney first saw (a teenage) John Lennon playing with the Quarrymen on the fateful day that they met (July 6th 1957) in Liverpool.

RITA#669aIt’s hard not to like Rob Reiner’s Stand By Me. Adapted from a Stephen King short-story, it has an impressive young cast (Wil Wheaton, River Pheonix, Corey Feldman and Kiefer Sutherland) and a lovely, wry narration by Richard Dreyfuss. Reiner’s film almost perfectly balances nostalgia with the thrill of youth. The script’s perspective might be of an older man looking backwards, but instead the film is driven by the optimism of the young leads looking forward to the future.

Hit: Stand By Me – Ben E. King

Hidden Gem: Come Go With Me – The Del-Vikings

Rocks In The Attic #668: Weezer – ‘Pacific Daydream’ (2017)

RITA#668What the fuck happened to Weezer? I stopped buying their records a long time ago – back when the weirdness of Pinkerton was just so disappointing in comparison to their classic 1994 debut – but I don’t recognise the band coming out of my speakers anymore.

They almost reeled me back in with 2001’s Hash Pipe – a single I might easily have responded with an ‘Ooooff’ when I first heard it – but the other big single from the Green album, Island In The Sun, showed that they were more at home writing pop songs. 2005’s Beverly Hills single sealed this, and now remains the song they’re most well-known for – the Buddy Holly of the 2000s.

By the time we get to 2017’s Pacific Daydream – a horrible title matched only the sheer awfulness of the cover image – it’s clear that Rivers Cuomo is more at home writing melodic pop songs than rocking out. If it came to light that he was behind a dozen Katy Perry and Taylor Swift songs, nobody would bat an eyelid.

The strange thing is that this doesn’t even sound like Weezer anymore – with the album’s production suffering from the same generic fingerprint of every nameless Top 20 pop-rock band of the last decade.

The only reason this bland excuse for a Weezer record sits on my shelves is that I saw it listed on Amoeba Record’s online store, fully autographed by the band (presumably after an in-store signing) and in a lovely red and black splatter vinyl, for a lower price than my local record store. Well, at least it makes for an attractive Frisbee.

Hit: Feels Like Summer

Hidden Gem: Mexican Fender

Rocks In The Attic #667: Various Artists – ’20 Solid Gold Hits Vol. 17’ (1977)

RITA#667The problem with New Zealand’s Solid Gold Hits series is that twenty songs crammed onto two sides of vinyl is just too much. It might have been okay with the first volume in 1972, but as running times got longer and longer throughout the decade, you end up with a very quiet, compressed listening experience.

Still, the series is sought-after by New Zealand record collectors. At the last record fair I attended, not only did I hear one guy continually ask the traders whether they had “any Solid Gold”, but one stall had a designated section set aside for entries in the series.

Not this guy though. I have no interest in collecting a run-of-the-mill compilation series with bad artwork and questionable content. The two standouts from this edition – Steve Miller’s Jet Airliner and 10cc’s Good Morning Judge – both already exist in my collection, on the original records they’re taken from. Aside from this, there’s not much else of interest aside from Bryan Ferry’s This Is Tomorrow and Heatwave’s Boogie Nights. In fact, the appearance of artists like David Soul, Smokie and Pussycat should relegate this to the bargain bin, whether it’s part of a series or not.

It’s a surprise that there isn’t a track on there by Les McQueen’s Crème Brûlée. It’s a shit business.

Hit: Jet Airliner – The Steve Miller Band

Hidden Gem: Good Morning Judge – 10cc

Rocks In The Attic #666: Black Sabbath – ‘Black Sabbath’ (1970)

RITA#666Six hundred and sixty six – the number of the beast. Not to be confused with six hundred and sixty eight – the neighbour of the beast.

Back in 2012, I missed out on a Black Sabbath vinyl box set – the first eight studio albums housed in a lovely black and purple sleeve. I couldn’t afford it at the time – what with buying a house and having children to feed. It quickly went out of print, and now changes hands for silly money online. Another box set collection will be released eventually, I thought. I avoided buying the individual albums – both brand new and second hand – like the black death.

Six years later, and a new Black Sabbath vinyl box set has finally landed. It’s called The Ten Year War box set, presumably named after their militancy against Birmingham barber shops in the 1970s. The set is essentially the same as the 2012 release, featuring the first eight studio records plus a couple of 7” records and some associated stuff (posters, tour programmes, a brochure and a hardback book).

RITA#666bThe strangest thing about this new release though is the addition of a USB stick featuring digital high-definition audio copies of each of the records. The USB drive is shaped as – you guessed it – a black crucifix. This is presumably handy at a midnight black mass, when the ominous sound of chanting gets a bit repetitive. Just halt the proceedings – spare the sacrificial virgin for a couple of extra minutes – while you plug in the USB, tell everybody to wait until you download the correct codec for your media player, and resume to the tune of Vol. 4’s Snowblind.

I’m not sure if it justifies the NZ$400 price tag though. Even in the recent 20%-off sale at JB HiFi, that brings it down to NZ$320. Eight records at forty bucks a pop – that’s the price of a standard new release. Aren’t bulk purchases supposed to offer a discount to the buyer?

RITA#666cThe box set’s unique selling point, as far as I’m concerned, is that the eight LPs are all pressed onto splatter vinyl. These look fantastic, but not worth that additional cost. I figured out I can buy 2015 reissues of each of the eight records individually – on boring, standard black vinyl – at twenty bucks a pop in the same sale.

So I did. The Sabbath drought is over!

Black Sabbath is about as strong a debut rock record as you could hope for. It’s the most interesting of the Ozzy Osbourne records, if only for the fact that it includes some ‘lighter’ material that would never see the light of day on later records. Due to this, it’s a lot more fun than the band’s output in the latter half of the decade. There’s a touch of blues on this record – a harmonica even makes an appearance! – something they would avoid on subsequent releases to focus more of the heavy metal dirge of doom that made them a household name.

Hit: Black Sabbath

Hidden Gem: The Wizard