Tag Archives: Stevie Nicks

Rocks In The Attic #487: The Jimi Hendrix Experience – ‘Live At Monterey’ (2007)

RITA#487What a performance! From the moment that Jimi kicks into the electrifying opening guitar riff from Howlin’ Wolf’s Killing Floor to the destruction of western pop music on the Troggs’ Wild Thing, he’s really setting out his stable to American audiences.

I’ve always regarded Hendrix as a British act – two thirds of the Experience were English, and Jimi had to come to London to kick off his solo career. Who knows what would have happened if he’d have turned down Chas Chadler’s offer to go to London? Would he have kept playing as a sideman? Would he have been noticed in some other way? They say that the cream always rises to the top, but there are plenty of examples of people being overlooked completely, or finally noticed by the mainstream when they’re well past their prime.

This was the Experience’s first show on American soil, at what was undoubtedly an important performance. After winning a coin toss to decide who played first, The Who played before Hendix, resulting in Pete Townshend destroying his guitar and Keith Moon kicking over his drum kit. Hendrix and his band had to follow this, and it’s clear that they don’t sound intimidated or nervous. Hendrix would of course upstage the Who, by not only destroying his guitar but by setting fire to it (with the help of some lighter fluid).

I recently saw the Hendrix biopic Jimi: All Is By My Side. I was excited to see it; Jimi’s one of my musical heroes. I had heard that Hendrix’s estate had not authorised the use of any of Jimi’s songs in the film, and this didn’t sound very promising. In the end, I didn’t miss any of Hendrix’s songs (Stevie Nicks’ guitarist Waddy Wachtel – he of the Edge Of Seventeen riff from Bella Donna – does a great Hendrix imitation), André Benjamin was uncannily outstanding as Hendrix, and the film covered enough of the events from that London scene before he broke through.

The problem with the film seemed to be the editing. It really felt like we were watching something that hadn’t been finished. Such a shame really, as it ticked a lot of boxes and failed at the last hurdle in how it was presented. Aw shucks.

Hit: Hey Joe

Hidden Gem: Killing Floor

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Rocks In The Attic #475: Stevie Nicks – ‘Bella Donna’ (1981)

RITA#475If American mattress-actress Belladonna started a musical career and called her debut solo album Stevie Nicks, well that’s just going to cause a headache for everybody. Let’s just all hope that that doesn’t happen.

This is Nick’s debut solo album, placed between Fleetwood Mac’s Tusk and Mirage. It doesn’t sound a million miles away from the Mac, and hit single Edge Of Seventeen is as strong as anything that you might expect from that band. The production just sounds a little more ‘80s; a tad more Tango In The Night than Rumours.

Away from the confines of a musical partnership, Nicks gets the opportunity to indulge herself here. You wouldn’t hear a song as countryfied as After The Glitter Fades on a Fleetwood Mac album, and she gets to entertain Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers on Stop Draggin’ My Heart Around – the only song on the record not to be written by Nicks. Even chief Eagle and professional nasty Don Henly makes an appearance on the subdued Leather And Lace.

While most songs could be lifted of any Mac album post 1975, there’s one moment on the record that would definitely have peaked Mac guitarist Lindsay Buckingham’s interest. Waddy Wachtel’s guitar riff on Edge Of Seventeen is the greatest moment on the album. Soon to be appropriated by Survivor on Eye Of The Tiger (released a year later in 1982), and sampled by Destiny’s Child on Bootylicious in 2001, it’s a thunderbolt of a hook.

Hit: Edge Of Seventeen

Hidden Gem: Bella Donna

Rocks In The Attic #440: Fleetwood Mac – ‘Rumours’ (1977)

RITA#440I saw Fleetwood Mac last night – a very wet, rainy night in Auckland to tick another band off my list. Outdoor concerts are always a risk, especially at this time of the year but a couple of bright pink ponchos (they only had pink left!) from the $2 shop were a lifesaver. When I put them on the counter to pay, the Asian lady on the till said “Ahh, you go concert!” so they must have done a run on them yesterday, hence why they only had pink ones left.

Any band that throw away something so fantastic as The Chain as their opening number must be something special. They absolutely caned Rumours for their first four songs – following The Chain with You Make Loving Fun, Dreams and Second Hand News – and you’d be forgiven for thinking that they had only ever recorded one album. In fact, by the end of their set, they only left two songs unplayed off this monster of a record – I Don’t Want To Know and Oh Daddy.

I’ve loved Rumours ever since I saw the album being picked apart on the first run of Classic Albums. That first bunch of albums covered by the show – Electric Ladyland, Graceland, Who’s Next, The Band – were an education, and the Fleetwood Mac episode was just as eye-opening. At that point in time (the early ‘90s), the band hadn’t yet reformed for The Dance so it looked unlikely that I’d ever get to see the band play live. They seem to have been touring non-stop ever since The Dance though, so it was only a matter of time.

Since 1998, Christine McVie hasn’t been playing with them, so I’ve been holding off – who wants to go and see a band who can’t play a third of their songs? Thankfully, she renounced her retirement from touring last year, and I finally got to see all five of them together.

Last night was a great concert – despite being sat up in the cheap seats with the riff-raff, in the pouring rain. Even Lorde was there (the closest thing to New Zealand rock royalty), braving the elements with her parents. At one point, a Facebook photo of Richie McCaw posing with his wife looking out from one of the corporate boxes buzzed through the crowd.

My favourite moment, other than the always awesome Tusk was the choruses of Little Lies – a blast of ‘80s pop brilliance where all three vocalists sing together. I was singing along with Lindsey Buckingham’s part at the end of each line – probably my favourite snippet of backing vocals from that entire decade.

Hit: Go Your Own Way

Hidden Gem: Second Hand News

Rocks In The Attic #278: Fleetwood Mac – ‘Tango In The Night’ (1987)

RITA#278When I was growing up, I heard a lot of this era of Fleetwood Mac. I’m not sure why, but maybe when Michael Jackson brought Bad out in 1987, I became a little more aware of music because of all the hype surrounding him, and as a result I probably took a little more interest in the Sunday Top 40 countdown on radio 1, and Thursday’s Top Of The Pops. I probably caught the occasional performance from this album, whilst waiting for the latest Michael Jackson video to appear.

For that reason, this album feels very natural to me, like slipping into a warm bath. For this era of Fleetwood Mac, it’s nowhere as good as Rumours, and I think you’d have to be crazy to suggest it’s even close, but it’s still a decent album with a lot of very strong pop songs.

I’ll always prefer the original, Peter Green-led Fleetwood Mac. In my eyes, they’re two very different bands, linked by that strange mid-period of albums after Green left and before Buckingham and Nicks came along. That doesn’t mean I don’t enjoy this line-up of the band though. It’s just a different prospect.

The three big singles from this album – Little Lies, Everywhere and Big Love – are very, very strong. The album seems to be pinned around them, and some of the lesser album tracks point to a lack of quality overall – something you can’t say about Rumours where every track is a killer. There were a total of six singles lifted from the album, with Seven Wonders, Family Man and Isn’t It Midnight rounding out the six.

My favourite song from the album is opener Big Love – and I love Lindsey Buckingham’s stripped-down live version of the song I heard on Cameron Crowe’s Elizabethtown soundtrack; but my favourite moment from the album is on side two opener Little Lies. The vocals on this Christine McVie track – Christine leading the chorus, followed by Stevie Nicks and finally by Buckingham sounding other-worldly – sounds just sublime to me. It’s a key moment when the whole band – and most importantly the three vocalists – lock-in so well together.

Hit: Little Lies

Hidden Gem: Caroline