Tag Archives: Genesis Live

Rocks In The Attic #552: Genesis – ‘Trespass’ (1970)

rita552I keep buying Genesis records, almost by accident, at record fairs. They’re always cheap – around the five dollar mark and so I reason that it can’t hurt to take them home. As a result, without any discernible effort I’ve managed to pick up most of their back catalogue – nine of their fifteen studio albums, plus 1973’s Genesis Live.

I wish original Pink Floyd records were as easy – and as cheap – to come across. This is a 1974 ABC Records re-pressing, and at five bucks was significantly cheaper than a Floyd record from around the same time would be.

I don’t think I’ll ever become a big Genesis fan no matter how many of their records I own. The Peter Gabriel years are all a bit too twee for me; a little bit too steeped in English folk. And while I prefer the Phil Collins era, there’s not a great deal of fresh air between those albums and a Collins solo record. I’m sure a diehard Genesis fan would disagree, but I’m too disinterested to spot the difference. Ah, ennui…

Hit: The Knife

Hidden Gem: White Mountain

Rocks In The Attic #453: Genesis – ‘Genesis Live’ (1973)

RITA#453I’m rather partial to a bit of Watcher Of The Skies – presented here in its live glory as the first song on this ‘inbetween’ record to fill the gap between Foxtrot and Selling England By The Pound. That’s not to say I’m a huge Genesis fan. I’m not. There’s just a bit too much in the way of keyboards on the earlier Peter Gabriel material, and I’m afraid to say that the Phil Collins years speak more to me, as disposable as they are.

I recently watched a documentary about the band (Genesis: Together And Apart), and not being a huge fan, two things really struck me. Firstly, how integral Tony Banks was (is?) to Genesis (the band was effectively built around him, not Peter Gabriel as I naively thought); and secondly, perhaps due to that very fact, how much of an absolute arsehole Tony Banks was (is?). Some people just shouldn’t let themselves be filmed. He single-handedly presents the band in a negative light, which I wouldn’t have any idea of if I hadn’t seen the documentary.

I now put Tony Banks in the same middle section of the Venn diagram (‘talented vs. complete arse’) as Don Henley from the Eagles. In the Eagles’ documentary History Of The Eagles, Henley’s recollection of the reasons why he fired guitarist Don Felder simply disgusted me. There are some people who are just so uptight, so against the spirit of rock ‘n roll, that you wonder how anybody in their right minds ever wanted to be in a band with them.

Hit: Watcher Of The Skies

Hidden Gem: The Return Of The Giant Hogweed