Tag Archives: Fuzzy Logic

Rocks In The Attic #729: Super Furry Animals – ‘SFA At The BBC’ (2018)

RITA#729The Super Furries have finally managed to do what every other British rock band of the last fifty years has done: released an album of their BBC sessions. Still, while it may seem like an establishment move, their execution of the release is very much in line with what you may expect from such a madcap band.

Released in limited numbers by Strangetown Records, and through pledgemusic.com, the packaging is just awesome. The 4xLP box-set (£85) I managed to secure was initially available as a run of 400, while an even-more limited 5xLP set was available in a run of just 100. Thankfully, this was sold out in seconds – I wouldn’t have been happy with paying a further £115 for three additional tracks. Buyer’s remorse is a very real thing in the world of record collecting.

RITA#729bThe outer-box and individual record sleeves take their design from the Golden Retriever Yeti stage-suits that the band wore on stage, with a lock of the stage-suit hair included in a hand-numbered envelope within. The 5xLP set goes one further and includes some of the Yeti hair actually pressed into the fifth disc. I guess that’s where the extra £115 went.

Despite selling out within minutes, Strangetown Records announced a second pressing of a further 500 copies of the 4xLP set. This led to a lot of complaints on social media, from buyers who were understandably a little miffed at paying for something that turned out not to be as limited as they were originally led to believe. Without apologising, Strangetown issued a response:

It has come to our attention that there needs to be clarity on the 2nd press of the SFA at the BBC box set. There is no difference between the first and second editions so if anyone is unhappy at the thought of owning a boxset that isn’t ltd to 400 copies then we are happy to issue a refund.

While I’m not too precious about owning something that exists in limited numbers or not, it does annoy me that they didn’t press more copies to begin with. There’s obviously a demand for it. They could have pressed thousands and still probably sold out; and pressing in smaller numbers just adds to the horribly negative ‘have / have not’ climate of record collecting. It’s also annoying to shell out for it in the run up to Christmas, when you think that hesitation will be punished.

The eight BBC sessions presented here take place between 1996 and 2001, covering the period between Fuzzy Logic and Rings Around The World, and were taken from a mixture of Steve Lamaq and Jo Whiley’s Evening Sessions, and sessions recorded for Mark Radcliff and John Peel. Not a band known for doing covers, it’s a rare treat to hear them covering a fairly respectable version of the Beach Boys’ Warmth Of The Sun, with this song chosen as they’re one of the only bands that they could all agree on.

The eighth and final side comes from Peel Acres itself, the Suffolk home of John Peel and his wife. As somebody whose musical interests were as weird and wide-ranging as the Super Furries, it’s fitting that Peel’s Brummie drawl is the last voice you hear after the final song:

If you come back again, which would obviously be wonderful if you did, we’ll move the football machine, and er, so there’s a bit more room. That would be handy, wouldn’t it, if we were to do that? Or perhaps we’d build an extension. <sings> BUILD AN EXTENSION! Er, but thanks very much for coming anyway, it’s been a real treat. All the best.

Hit: Something For The Weekend

Hidden Gem: Some Things Come From Nothing

RITA#729a

Rocks In The Attic #221: Super Furry Animals – ‘Outspaced’ (1998)

RITA#221With many thanks to my university housemates of my third year, Ferg and Kaj, this album was my introduction to the Super Furries. Most other people found the band through their debut, Fuzzy Logic, which I turned to next, but this b-sides and rarities album was an ample introduction to one of the best – and most enduring – bands to have emerged during the ‘90s.

There’s nothing to dislike on this album – the Welsh songs from their Llanfairpwllgwyngyllgogerychwyndrobwllantysiliogogogochynygofod (In Space) EP (a reissue of which I have in my 7” collection), their Moog Droog EP, and numerous b-sides from their first couple of albums. The jewel in the crown is The Man Don’t Give A Fuck – a 1996 single built around an obscene lyric from Steely Dan’s Show Biz Kids.

That song followed me around for a while – not only was it always one of my fall-back songs to play when DJing after I left university, but a poster for the single adorned the living room of a later shared house, thanks to fellow SFA-fan Moo.

Some b-sides albums by bands can be very patchy affairs, without the coherence of a studio-album’s structure to pull it together. SFA are such an odd band – playing across so many different musical styles, and making huge left turns at every single point in time – that this album gels just as well as their studio albums from around the same time. Because of that, I’ve always regarded it as album number three proper, due to the place it falls in their chronology.

This album holds some very nice memories – Ferg endlessly singing Guacamole to himself when the album was first released, seeing SFA play live at Glastonbury a year later and watching them encore with The Man Don’t Give A Fuck as a van drove slowly into the crowd assembled at The Other Stage (when people started to climb onto the van, a large black fellow, presumably the driver, looking like B.A. Baracus, also got up there and started throwing people off into the crowd – this whole bizarre scenario was captured in the film of the clip available on their Songbook DVD), playing songs from the album during my DJ sets at 38 Bar / The Castle in Oldham, and generally just coming back to these songs time and time again.

Hit: The Man Don’t Give A Fuck

Hidden Gem: Dim Brys: Dim Chwys