Tag Archives: Frogstomp

Rocks In The Attic #830: Silverchair – ‘Frogstomp’ (1995)

RITA#830Definitely an album from my youth. I was 17 when I saw Silverchair on this tour at Manchester University’s Student’s Union. Was I jealous? Of course, I was. Here were three 15-year old Australians, touring the world as a rock band, albeit chaperoned by their parents.

It’s even more incredible to find out that this record was recorded in 9 days. Produced by Kevin Shirley, who would go on to record much bigger things (one of his next jobs was co-producing Aerosmith’s Nine Lives), it’s twelve songs of teen-angst doom rock, put through a grunge filter. Back Sabbath via Pearl Jam.

One of the songwriting strengths of frontman Daniel John and drummer Ben Gillies is they don’t fall back on a great riff and stretch it out to a verse-verse-chorus-verse-chorus formula. Their songs have multiple sections where new riffs and grooves are introduced out of the blue.

RITA#830aYou can listen to a song like Faultline and think you understand where it’s going, but then a different section starts at 2:50. Okay, you think, they’ll just stay on this jam until the end of the song. And then it changes again at 3:25. It’s something that you can spot in early Sabbath, Deep Purple and Metallica; a progressive rock approach to heavy metal.

A year after this album’s release, when the band were still only 16 years old, one of their songs, the album’s opener Israel’s Son, was used as the scapegoat defence by the lawyer of two American teenagers found guilty of shooting one of their sets of parents and a younger brother. Obviously, it wasn’t the first time rock music has been blamed for acts of senseless violence and destruction, and it won’t be the last. Lawyers have just stopped playing albums backwards to look for blame.

This release is a nice 2019 reissue by Simply Vinyl on double frog-green vinyl, including an etched D-side (of the frog) and limited to 5,000 copies. Simply Vinyl might be one of my favourite reissue labels. This record is only 44 minutes long and could easily have fit on two sides of wax, but I’m glad they gave it some space to breathe across three sides.

I tried and tried to unlock the band’s follow-up, Freak Show (1997), but it didn’t grab me the same way, and by Neon Ballroom (1999) I had left the party.

Hit: Tomorrow

Hidden Gem: Madman

RITA#830b

Rocks In The Attic #800: Black Sabbath – ‘Paranoid’ (1970)

RITA#800Post number 800 of this humble blog finds us with one of the greatest albums in rock and metal, Black Sabbath’s Paranoid.

It’s one of those cornerstone records, like AC/DC’s Highway To Hell or Led Zeppelin IV, which just feels bigger than the sum of its parts. If the Beatles’ 1969 swansong Abbey Road served as the blueprint for rock albums for the 1970s, then Black Sabbath’s celebrated second album surely served as the heavy metal equivalent. The musical leap from Come Together to War Pigs feels like light years, but the two album openers were released only 12 months apart.

Released in the same year as their doom-laden debut album, Paranoid arrived in September 1970 on the Vertigo label in the UK (and Warner Bros. in the US market). The record company, satisfied with the band’s debut, asked for more of the same. Black Sabbath was recorded in one day, a marathon sprint of twelve hours, but for Paranoid the band were afforded the luxury of a whole six days to record.

Black Sabbath File Photos
Much has been written about hit-single Paranoid being written in five minutes, tossed off to make up one last song for the album. Bassist Geezer Butler claims it was done and dusted in two hours, from the moment Tony Iommi came up with the monster guitar riff, to the band laying down the track to finish off the album. But as good as the song is, its oversaturation on rock radio makes it one of the least interesting things about the record.

Things start off with War Pigs, the quintessential long-form metal song. A languorous opening and ominous sirens announce something big is on the horizon, before the song stops dead. Bill Ward’s hi-hat counts in Iommi’s stabbing power chords, as Ozzy Osbourne sings the opening verse. This leads to the main riff, before it breaks down again. Clocking in at almost eight minutes, the song doesn’t ever get boring.

Black Sabbath File Photos

After the comparatively throwaway title track, the band slips into neutral on the stoner favourite Planet Caravan, before picking up speed again on the album’s other big guitar centrepiece, Iron Man. Across those first four songs, Iommi provides some of the genre’s greatest guitar riffs – War Pigs alone has half a dozen different sections – and it makes for the best ‘side’ of metal until perhaps the second-side of AC/DC’s Back In Black or the first side of Def Leppard’s Hysteria (both of which would have been categorised as metal before history downgraded them to heavy rock).

RITA#800cSilverchair’s debut Frogstomp from 1995 is a good example of a Sabbath-influenced metal album that matches the riffs-per-song ratio of Paranoid. But for the rest of the band’s career, Iommi would be a little less generous with his riffs. Paranoid’s less celebrated second side is therefore more representative of the albums that followed: moderate-tempo doom-based rockers with screaming banshee vocals, usually based around one or two killer riffs per song.

Paranoid was the first Sabbath album I heard, and so it was my gateway into the band. After digesting everything I could from Aerosmith and AC/DC, I skipped the Allman Brothers and shifted to the ‘B’ section of the record shop. But like AC/DC’s albums, I was always a little let down by Sabbath’s mid-90s CD remasters. Aerosmith’s CD remasters had great little fold-out booklets with photos and artwork from the albums’ promotional campaigns. In comparison, AC/DC, Sabbath and Motörhead had nothing in their reissues – usually just a tracklisting. I’d have loved an essay, or some retrospective liner notes, but maybe record companies don’t think heavy metal fans can read?

Hit: Paranoid

Hidden Gem: Planet Caravan

RITA#800d