Tag Archives: Dirty Deeds Done Dirt Cheap

Rocks In The Attic #252: AC/DC – ‘’74 Jailbreak’ (1984)

RITA#252When I was greedily consuming AC/DC’s back catalogue at the tender age of 14, this was always the album I could never bring myself to buy. It’s not even an album – it’s an EP of five songs previously released on the band’s Australian albums (but missing from the international releases), to celebrate the band’s 10th anniversary – which all sounds fine until you consider that it was priced the same as all their other albums. It was either this or a full album for the same price; so it remained an aspirational purchase, always slightly out of my reach.

A matured appreciation of the band’s back catalogue now makes this an essential purchase – the title track is worth the price alone. Originally released on the Australian version of Dirty Deeds Done Dirt Cheap, Jailbreak saw the light of day in the UK in 1976. It was released as a single on the same day as the Thin Lizzy song of the same name. That must have been a confusing day for denim-clad rockers in record shops.

It’s odd that the song was never used on any of the international releases until this EP came out, despite the band releasing it as a single and going to the trouble of shooting a great music video to promote it. The song was later to feature on the double-disc version of AC/DC Live in 1992, although this 14-minute version, split with a lengthy instrumental break to soundtrack Angus’ striptease, isn’t the best version. It’s a great pop song, but remains a largely ignored slice of their canon (no pun intended).

The rest of the EP’s tracks are taken from the original Aussie release of the band’s debut – High Voltage – and were probably overlooked by Atlantic Records in favour of the heavier songs on their second album. I guess when you take two albums and split them into one, you’re always going to have to leave something by the side of the road.

I can do without the cover of Baby, Please Don’t Go – it isn’t a patch on the seminal version by Van Morrison and Them – but Soul Stripper is fantastic. It’s a groove-based slow-burner, probably excluded from the international releases because of its length (6:25) and its lyrics which paint Bon Scott as a weak virgin – ‘then she made me say things I didn’t want to say / then she made me play games I didn’t want to play’.

Instrumentation other than guitar, bass and drums are usually very rare on an AC/DC track – unless you’re talking about bagpipes, cannons or (hells) bells – but Soul Stripper has a great cowbell-like percussive touch that sets it apart from the other songs cut from High Voltage. The effect makes the song sounds ominous – a true hidden gem.

Hit: Jailbreak

Hidden Gem: Soul Stripper

Rocks In The Attic #198: AC/DC – ‘Let There Be Rock’ (1977)

RITA#198This album is such a quantum leap from Dirty Deeds Done Dirt Cheap, but it still doesn’t sound like the AC/DC of today. The production is more confident than the band’s previous two albums, but the overall sound comes across as noisy rather than channelled, as though the engineer and the producers made a few bad choices on the day of the recording, in terms of setting up the mics in the studio for the amps.

When I started listening to AC/DC in the early ‘90s they were terribly unfashionable. Just like Iron Maiden and Def Leppard, they were seen as relics of the ‘70s and ‘80s – something that just wasn’t relevant any more, to anybody. I couldn’t believe when I found a friend at college who liked the band too. I truly thought I was alone in liking them.

Then slowly, they started to become less of a laughing stock, and more of a valid influence on people. When I started DJing in the late ‘90s, I would slip the odd ‘DC track into my set, mainly to blank stares. Then something happened in popular culture – I’m not exactly sure what – but they suddenly became a very cool band to listen to. Each week, I started getting requests to play some of their stuff – and not specific songs either, just a “’Ere mate, you got any ‘DC?”, as though anything I could have played by the band would have sufficed.

Now, thanks to films like Iron Man featuring Back In Black (and its sequel featuring an entire set of ‘DC songs), the band seems to be everywhere. Now I just need to wait for that Aerosmith revival to happen…

Hit: Whole Lotta Rosie

Hidden Gem: Hell Ain’t A Bad Place To Be

Rocks In The Attic #142: AC/DC – ‘Dirty Deeds Done Dirt Cheap’ (1976)

For me, and I’m talking about the international version of the Dirty Deeds album, this is where AC/DC really start sounding like AC/DC. The High Voltage album (again, to take the international release as gospel) sounds like a band searching for their sound, and I guess a few of the songs included here don’t really fit with the AC/DC template – or at least not as much as other songs on the album.

A lot of people don’t like it, but I really like the cover to this album. Designed by Hipgnosis, it’s essentially a stock photo of an American motel, with a range of random everyday people superimposed in the foreground. Those people, for no reason explained anywhere on the cover – or even in the title of the album – have their eyes blanked out with black bars. To make it even stranger, there is a Doberman amongst the crowd, and he doesn’thave a black bar across his eyes. Go figure.

The real gem of this album is Ride On– a slow blues, and for me a career highlight which they never came close to matching. I’d compare it to Since I’ve Been Loving You (from Led Zeppelin III) in that in both cases, the respective bands have endlessly tried to replicate these songs on subsequent releases without reaching those peaks again.

Hit: Dirty Deeds Done Dirt Cheap

Hidden Gem: Ride On