Tag Archives: Corey Feldman

Rocks In The Attic #865: Harry Manfredini – ‘Friday The 13th Part IV – The Final Chapter (O.S.T.)’ (1984)

RITA#864When I was just six years old, my brother tried to scare me by showing me the box-cover of this film at the video shop. The poster of the film depicts Jason’s mask, lying in a pool of blood, with a knife sticking out one of the eye-holes. To my six-year old mind, I thought it was a picture of a potato. That’s not scary at all. What’s scary about potatoes? I’ve since heard similar stories by people who saw the poster when they were a similar age, and they thought it was a potato too. You say hockey-mask, I say potato, let’s call the whole thing off.
Is there any better indicator that you’re watching an ‘80s film than Corey Feldman being in the cast? Not only do we get Feldman in the same year he appeared in Gremlins, before he broke through with The Goonies in 1985 and Stand By Me in 1986, but Friday The 13th: The Final Chapter also gives us a pre-Back To The Future Crispin Glover. Outside of Kevin Bacon’s appearance in the first film, Feldman and Glover’s presence make The Final Chapter the most star-packed episode in the series.

RITA#864aSpoiler alert: it wasn’t the final chapter at all. In fact, Part IV, as we’ll refer to it, was far from being the final chapter. It’s very much mid-period Jason. Producer Frank Mancuso Jr. – the son of Paramount CEO Frank Mancuso Sr. – titled it as such as he was embarrassed at being linked to the franchise. Regardless of how much money the series was raking in, he felt like killing off Jason would end the films and would allow him to concentrate on more respectable projects. We don’t even get roman numerals in the film’s title this time, although the strap-line would have served as a clever marketing move – “Gee, we had better go and see this one! It’s the last one they’re going to make!”

As is now par for the course by this point in the series, we open on a recap of parts I, II and III – “Previously…on Friday The 13th”. Framed around the fireside chat from Part II, we hear Paul from that film narrate the legend of Jason Voorhees, while we see a montage of kills from the three films so far.

Instead of the film’s block title advancing towards the camera, we now see the mask do the same trick. All of a sudden, the mask is now the icon of the series, and would remain so forever. Jason would wear the mask permanently from this moment on.

The opening scenes, set in a middle-of-the-night hospital where they have taken the corpses from the end of Part III, is very reminiscent of Halloween II, a film that had only been released two years earlier. The subtle, blink-and-you’ll-miss-it shot of Jason’s breath as the doctor loads him into the freezer is a wonderful piece of filmmaking. From this detail, you already know you’re in far safer hands than Steve Miner’s tired direction of Part III. Joesph Zito directs Part IV, and he makes it one of the stronger films in the franchise alongside Part II.

RITA#864b
We’re introduced to the 12-year old Corey Feldman, who lives with his older sister and their mother, and we have a bunch of young kids moving into the house next door (I wonder what’s going to happen here!). Crispin Glover does some crazy dancing, ahead of his crazy dancing at the ‘Enchantment Under The Sea’ Dance in Back To The Future.

It’s in this film where we glimpse the Pamela Voorhees ‘1979’ gravestone that knocked the franchise off into its wonky timeframe. This film was released in 1984, but by now we’ve caught up after Part II thrust us five years into the future. Part III took place the day after Part II, and we stay in the same timeframe, with Part IV taking place the day after Part III. Phew, keep up people…

The music, again by Harry Manfredini, is, of course, as excellent as always. Part IV is a strong, well-made film; perhaps as strong, if not stronger, than Part II. Now if only we could sidestep Part V

Hit: What Boy, Ma’am? / Main Titles

Hidden Gem: Helicopter

Body Count: 14

RITA#864c

Rocks In The Attic #669: Various Artists – ‘Stand By Me (O.S.T.)’ (1986)

RITA#669There were a number of films released through the 1980s which went some way in redefining the seminal singles of the 1950s and 1960s. Lawrence Kasdan’s The Big Chill kicked off the nostalgia in 1983, before Rob Reiner’s Stand By Me and Oliver Stone’s Platoon landed in 1986. By the time of 1988’s Good Morning Vietnam, it was almost commonplace for a Hollywood film to feature a ‘golden oldies’ soundtrack.

Along the more obvious hits on this soundtrack – Buddy Holly’s Everyday, Jerry Lee Lewis’ Great Balls Of Fire, and of course, Ben E. King’s Stand By Me – there’s one very interesting addition. The Del-Viking’s Come Go With Me might sound like any other late-‘50s R&B, but it was actually the song that a teenage Paul McCartney first saw (a teenage) John Lennon playing with the Quarrymen on the fateful day that they met (July 6th 1957) in Liverpool.

RITA#669aIt’s hard not to like Rob Reiner’s Stand By Me. Adapted from a Stephen King short-story, it has an impressive young cast (Wil Wheaton, River Pheonix, Corey Feldman and Kiefer Sutherland) and a lovely, wry narration by Richard Dreyfuss. Reiner’s film almost perfectly balances nostalgia with the thrill of youth. The script’s perspective might be of an older man looking backwards, but instead the film is driven by the optimism of the young leads looking forward to the future.

Hit: Stand By Me – Ben E. King

Hidden Gem: Come Go With Me – The Del-Vikings

Rocks In The Attic #622: Jerry Goldsmith – ‘Gremlins (O.S.T.)’ (1984)

RITA#622.jpgGremlins is such a great film; one of those movies from my childhood that was a little bit scary but a whole lot of fun. I would have only been six years old when I first watched it, half laughing, half watching through my fingers. I re-watched it recently just to check whether it was as good as I remembered. Perhaps the special effects would have dated the film, or maybe I hadn’t noticed if the acting was hammy back when I was a kid.

Watching the film in 2017, it’s still a joy to watch. The special effects – made before the age of computer effects – hold up really well, and all of the performances are as good as you’d expect from what is essentially a B-movie picture. I couldn’t help but thinking that with Hollywood’s sometime lazy approach to filmmaking, surely a remake is on the cards at some point. A truly terrible thought as such a project would probably involve a lot of CGI and a cast of bland stars.

RITA#622aMost of the laughs in Gremlins comes from the creature effects, and you can tell that the team behind these had loads of fun coming up with disgusting ways for the little critters to behave. It almost feels like two projects on the screen at once – one, a film of a smalltown hero battling the odds to save the day, and a second project, led by the creations of special effects artist Chris Walas, ultimately aimed at innovating ways of showing the gremlins causing mayhem. At one point, the special effects crew had a list on the wall titled ‘Horrible Things To Do To Gizmo’.

RITA#622bAs well as the obvious nostalgia factor, a re-watch of the film also pays off to spot small parts from actors who went on to bigger things. Judge Reinhold (Beverly Hills Cop, Fast Times At Ridgemont High), Corey Feldman (Lost Boys, The Goonies) and Jonathan Banks (Breaking Bad, Beverly Hills Cop) all put in appearances, but it is the film’s location that feels the most familiar. Filmed on the same Universal Studios backlot as the following year’s Back To The Future, the small town terrorised by the gremlins is essentially a modern-day Hill Valley. Even the cinema, where the gremlins gather to watch Snow White And The Seven Dwarfs, is in the same location as the one showing The Atomic Kid in 1955 Hill Valley.

RITA#622cRe-released by Mondo Records in 2016, this double LP is an incredibly well thought out package with design elements by Phantom City Creative reflecting the events of the film. The records – one disc on brown and white swirl mogwai vinyl, and one on green swirl gremlin vinyl – come in a UV sensitive gatefold jacket; when exposed to daylight, the cover reveals additional artwork. The inner sleeves are water sensitive as well, revealing additional artwork when exposed to a damp cloth.

Hit: The Gremlin Rag

Hidden Gem: The Shop