Tag Archives: Bret Easton Ellis

Rocks In The Attic #562: Various Artists – ‘Less Than Zero (O.S.T.)’ (1987)

rita562I watched this film for the first time recently. I’d always been aware of it because it’s one of a handful of notable soundtrack appearances by Aerosmith from around this time. The Aerosmith completist in me searched this record out long before I had a chance to watch the movie.

The soundtrack opens strongly with a Permanent Vacation-era Aerosmith rocking out to a cover of Huey “Piano” Smith’s Rockin’ Pneumonia And The Boogie Woogie Flu. Drummer Joey Kramer is on fine powerhouse form, and the band really sound as young and energetic as anybody else, enjoying their second lease of life in post-rehab sobriety. The record was released by Def Jam, and many of the songs were produced by Rick Rubin, so I can only presume Aerosmith are included as a result of the Run-DMC connection.

The rest of the record – mostly cover songs – is a patchy affair. Poison’s weak attempt at Kiss’ Rock And Roll All Nite belies the whole glam rock movement’s claim to artistic merit, Slayer’s version of Iron Butterfly’s In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida is fun, while the Bangles’ version of Simon and Garfunkel’s Hazy Shade Of Winter sounds like they’re on autopilot.

So I sat down to finally watch the film I knew the music of so well. I really wish I hadn’t. If anything, Less Than Zero resembles the awful St. Elmo’s Fire in terms of its shallow posturing, although it is slightly harder-edged coming a couple of years after that earlier film. As an adaptation of Bret Easton Ellis’s debut novel, I have trouble seeing any of his satire on the screen as it seems to have been overwhelmed by big gloop of late-‘80s Hollywood sheen that engulfs the film.

Something terrible happened as I watched the final act of the film. I got a slap in the face from déjà vu when Andrew McCarthy’s character narrowly prevented Robert Downey, Jr.’s character from taking part in a gay tryst. Then, in the final shot of the film where McCarthy, Downey, Jr. and Jami Gertz are driving off into the sunset, and McCarthy realises that Downey, Jr. has died from a drug overdose, I had a realisation myself. I had seen this film before. I just hadn’t remembered it because it was so forgettable.

Hit: A Hazy Shade Of Winter – The Bangles

Hidden Gem: Rockin’ Pneumonia And The Boogie Woogie Flu – Aerosmith

Rocks In The Attic #329: Huey Lewis & The News – ‘Fore!’ (1986)

RITA#329A definite guilty pleasure, this is the first album I ever remember owning. I doubt we actually owned a copy though, we probably borrowed the LP from the library and taped it. Thank you Oldham libraries. Still, it’s the first record I remember playing over and over. Passion for the album undoubtedly came from the inclusion of The Power Of Love from the soundtrack to the first Back To The Future film. Strangely, the track was only added to the European and Japanese releases of the album, which means that in their native country the album had to stand up on its own merits.

I remember getting a lot of stick for liking Huey Lewis & The News at the time. They weren’t cool, and that doesn’t seem to have changed over time. There’s a great reference to the band in an episode of the overlooked sitcom Up All Night (with Christina Applegate and Will Arnett) where they try and impress a recently moved-in neighbour couple. When Will Arnett’s character attends their house-warming party dressed in a Huey Lewis t-shirt, he crumbles under questioning from his wife as to whether he’s wearing the t-shirt to be ironic or not. Man, I would love a Huey Lewis t-shirt – and not to wear ironically.

Obviously the other film to feature a song from this album is American Psycho, with Hip To Be Square used to soundtrack one of Patrick Bateman’s murders. In the excellent novel by Bret Easton Ellis, a whole chapter is devoted to the merits of Huey Lewis & The News (similar chapters are devoted to Whitney Houston and Phil Collins). The disappointing film adaptation does little to capture the wit of the novel, and Bateman’s short monologue about Huey Lewis is the only concession to these bizarre chapters amongst Bateman’s obsession with ‘80s fashion and the aesthetics of business cards.

The Power Of Love is one of those movie soundtracks songs from the ‘80s that I don’t think I will ever get bored of (it doesn’t hurt that Back To The Future is such a strong film). I guess when you think about it, it’s strange that the song chosen to musically represent the film’s protagonist espouses the virtues of love, while the film ends on such a materialistic note (which would have been far worse if Crispin Glover’s claims are anything to go by). Marty’s return to Jennifer, and subsequent kiss, almost seem to take second-billing to the revelation that Marty’s father is now a successful author and can afford to buy Marty a brand-new pickup truck. The sequel’s convoluted storyline takes this a cynical step forward with Marty attempting to use time-travel to win sports bets for monetary gain.

Or maybe you shouldn’t think too hard about ‘80s films…

Hit: The Power Of Love

Hidden Gem: Naturally