Tag Archives: Billy Preston

Rocks In The Attic #336: Various Artists – ‘Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band (O.S.T.)’ (1978)

RITA#336The one person who should be stood up against a wall and shot for this travesty of an album is George Martin. In just eighty three minutes, Martin manages to avoid all traces of innovation he was known for in the previous decade, and produces an album full of schlocky middle-of-the-road Beatles covers. With very few exceptions, each song sounds like it was recorded with Murph and the Magictones (in the Armada Room at the Holiday Inn, “Quando Quando Quando…”).

I’ve never seen the film that this album soundtracks, and I don’t think I ever want to. I’ve seen the segment where Aerosmith perform Come Together on YouTube – the highlight of the album (and while you might think I would say that, being a diehard and unapologetic Aerosmith fan, Robert Christgau earmarked it at the time as being the best of a very bad bunch, along with Earth, Wind & Fire’s Got To Get You Into My Life); but the farcical stuff that was going on around Aerosmith, involving Frankie Howerd, was very hard to watch.

Who would ever want to listen to Donald Pleasance sing (or rather, say) I Want You (She’s So Heavy)? While Peter Sellers doing A Hard Day’s Night in the ‘60s raised a smile, this just sounds bad. And Frankie Howerd singing When I’m Sixty-Four and Mean Mr. Mustard? Are you fucking joking?

Just to make things ever worse, the album is one of those annoying ‘70s double albums where sides A and D are on one disc, and B and C share the other disc. I’m prepared to forgive certain double albums for this (Electric Ladyland, Songs In The Key Of Life, for example), but with this album being so unlistenable I really resent the inconvenience. Did anybody ever even see one of those turntables that would play this sequence of sides? I’m sure it was just a record company conspiracy to confuse stoned people in the 1970s: “Hey man, as well as being blind, Stevie Wonder doesn’t seem to be able to spell. What gives, dude?”

Hit: Got To Get You Into My Life – Earth, Wind & Fire

Hidden Gem: Get Back – Billy Preston

Rocks In The Attic #244: The Rolling Stones – ‘Goats Head Soup’ (1973)

RITA#244This album gets a lot of stick, mainly because it has the nerve to the be the record that followed Exile On Main St. Well, one record had to be, didn’t it?

The highlight on this album – aside from the oft overlooked Doo Doo Doo Doo Doo (Heartbreaker) – is the piano playing by Nicky Hopkins and Ian Stewart, on most of the tracks, but also some really nice clavinet parts by Billy Preston. Keyboards usually have to struggle for space with the ever-present guitars on a Rolling Stones record, but on Goats Head Soup, a lot of the tracks are full of piano. Is this is a sign that Keith Richards and Mick Taylor outdid themselves on Exile, and were taking a well-earned rest?

Angie definitely points to a more delicate change in direction, a natural progression from Wild Horses from Sticky Fingers, and basically the template for every future Stones ballad. It’s the perfect representation of the album as a whole – laid back, low-key and a sign that the band was starting to wind down after three or four intense years spent changing the musical landscape.

Hit: Angie

Hidden Gem: Doo Doo Doo Doo Doo (Heartbreaker)

Rocks In The Attic #107: Various Artists – ‘Inglourious Basterds (O.S.T.)’ (2009)

Rocks In The Attic #107: Various Artists - ‘Inglourious Basterds (O.S.T.)’ (2009)Of all of Tarantino’s films so far, this is probably the one I’ve liked the least. Death Proof was pretty poor, for no other reason than it was just plain boring; this film however, was insulting in its revisionist fantasy retelling of WWII events.

The soundtracks jars slightly too, because among snippets of Morricone film scores (which prop up the album), there are odd choices that sit in-between them.  Songs like David Bowie’s Cat People (Putting Out The Fire) or Billy Preston’s Slaughter would have fit into any other Tarantino soundtrack – but as an accompaniment to a period film, which otherwise is well scored with Morricone’s western themes, they feel just a little too much out of place.

The vinyl artwork for this soundtrack is very nice – made to look like a very old 1940s release, with water marks around the edges and publicity shots from the film printed with Ben-Day dots.

Hit: The Verdict – Ennio Morricone

Hidden Gem: White Lightning (Main Title) – Charles Bernstein