Tag Archives: Austin Powers

Rocks In The Attic #670: Alan Moorhouse – ‘Beatles, Bach, Bacharach Go Bossa’ (1971)

RITA#670This is a lovely little slice of lounge music, not a million miles away from the camp shtick you might find on the first Austin Powers soundtrack. My wife finds records like these in the charity shop, and 9 times out of 10 they’re always worth a listen to.

The liner notes for this MFP release, by Bill Wellings, promise that ‘The four Beatles numbers (including George Harrison’s Something) are already well known to you, but they sound really fresh and inviting in their smart new Brazilian style.’ I guess you know you’ve made it when your songs are reworked into a musical style from another continent.

‘So, if your party ever looks like sagging in the middle, switch on to the Beatles, Bach & Bacharach in Bossa Beat – and give the party a swingin’ new lease of life!’

Hit: Yesterday

Hidden Gem: Air On A G String

RITA#670a

Rocks In The Attic #580: Burt Bacharach – ‘Casino Royale (O.S.T.)’ (1967)

RITA#580The stain on the James Bond film series for almost forty years before it was remade, Casino Royale began life as Ian Fleming’s first 007 novel. When EON producers Harry Saltzman and Cubby Broccoli optioned the film series of the books, Casino Royale was the only existing novel that slipped through their fingers. After the owner of the rights to the novel, Charles K. Feldman, failed in his attempt to persuade Saltzman and Broccoli to film Casino Royale, he took it upon himself to produce the adaptation.

In 1967, two months prior to the release of You Only Live Twice, cinema goers around the world were confused by this alternative James Bond film, a spoof on spy thrillers with little or no relation to Saltzman and Broccoli’s films. It’s a huge compliment to refer to it as a James Bond film, when it is in fact one of the worst films ever produced within the parameters of a larger film franchise. It makes The Phantom Menace look like the work of Christopher Nolan.

Five (plus one uncredited) directors worked on the film, and given that this isn’t an anthology film, that just shows what a mess of a production it was. A 1967 film starring Peter Sellers and Woody Allen at the height of their comedic powers should be great; instead it’s a disappointing headache of a film.

The only saving grace of the film is the soundtrack – a score by Burt Bacharach, featuring one of his all-time best collaborations with Dusty Springfield on The Look Of Love. Herb Alpert & The Tijuana Brass kick things off with some nice trumpet jazz on the film’s main title, but the remainder of the soundtrack is composed by Bacharach. As a whole, the soundtrack is very much of its time – something Mike Myers and Jay Roach spoofed so well in Austin Powers: International Man Of Mystery. One gets the idea that just twelve months following the release of Casino Royale, the soundtrack would have sounded old-hat already. Looking back, it’s a nice piece of swinging London brought to life through the speakers.

Hit: The Look Of Love Dusty Springfield

Hidden Gem: Casino Royale Theme – Herb Alpert & The Tijuan Brass

Rocks In The Attic #427: Sergio Mendes & Brasil ‘66 – ‘Greatest Hits’ (1970)

RITA#427I’ve loved Mas Que Nada ever since I heard it on the first Austin Powers soundtracks, in the days where I would immediately buy the soundtrack if I liked a film. In fact, now that I think about it, the film studios would have got a fair bit of money from me around the late ‘90s. I would go and watch a film on a Friday night, and usually if I like it enough I would go out and buy the soundtrack the next day. This makes me feel much better about the way I – ahem – watch films these days.

Given the size of Brazil – f**king massive – it’s surprising that the country hasn’t exported more musical artists to the western world. Scratching my head, the only other Brazilians I can think of are Sepultura and Seu Jorge. Yes, it’s a poor country, but that shouldn’t stop musicians upping sticks and hitchhiking north to the bright lights of North America. Instead Brazilian musicians tend to be famous for older musical styles – essentially for any instrument that doesn’t require a plug.

As much as I love Mas Que Nada, the rest of this album is made up of mostly average easy-listening covers. Unfortunately I can’t listen to this type of music without thinking of Austin Powers gyrating on a rotating circular bed.

Hit: Mas Que Nada

Hidden Gem: Night And Day