Category Archives: Prince

Rocks In The Attic #507: Prince – ‘Prince’ (1979)

RITA#5072016 has been a terrible year for celebrity deaths, particularly those from music, films and television. The year started off tainted by the death of Motörhead’s Lemmy Kilmister just a few days before New Year. Then things started to go crazy with David Bowie dying suddenly on the tenth of January. Following him, we’ve also seen the passing of Eagle Glenn Frey, Beatles producer George Martin, Keith Emerson, Merle Haggard, Elvis’ guitarist Scotty Moore, and many, many more.

Losing Bowie was bad enough, but any year where we lose somebody as iconic as him, plus Prince, plus Muhammad Ali is just plain crazy. It’s like the icons of the late twentieth century are falling off the planet. I’m half expecting a plane carrying Madonna, Tom Cruise and Bruce Springsteen to crash into the Hollywood sign, while Los Angeles succumbs to a devastating earthquake.

Prince’s death seemed to hit a little closer to home, only because he had just played in Auckland a few weeks earlier as part of his Piano And Microphone tour. I would have loved to see Prince, backed by a full band but I didn’t really like the idea of seeing him play unaccompanied. There’s a part of me that regrets not chasing down a ticket, just because it was my last chance to see him perform, but with his passing I’m even more glad that I didn’t go – I like to think that my seat went to a more deserving fan.

I can take or leave Prince. His Batman soundtrack was the first album I ever owned, and I like a good deal of his big hits; I just don’t like all the Sexy Motherf*cker bullshit that he descended to in the early nineties. His contractual dispute with Warner Brothers around that time – leading to him changing his name to the symbol and writing ‘Slave’ on his cheek also turned me off him. All of a sudden, just as I was getting into music in a big way, he didn’t seem to be about the music anymore.

His Greatest Hits album is superb though, and the song off that record I’ve always liked the best is the opening number I Wanna Be Your Lover, taken from this, his self-titled second album. The recent repressing of his back catalogue on vinyl has given me the opportunity to buy the album (I’ve never seen an original pressing in the wild), and it’s a great record.

The album version of I Wanna Be Your Lover sounds even better, being a few minutes longer than the single edit available on his Greatest Hits, and the other singles from the record are all worthy additions to his canon. I can’t remember the last time I liked a record so much from start to finish.

What’s not to like? All the upbeat songs are of a similar quality to I Wanna Be Your Lover, and the slower ballads don’t grate as much as some of the soppier ballads from later in his career. I might put my toe further in the purple water, and try out some of his other records now that they’re widely available again.

Hit: I Wanna Be Your Lover

Hidden Gem: Bambi

Rocks In The Attic #363: Prince – ‘Batman (O.S.T.)’ (1989)

RITA#363This was the first album I remember owning on CD. I think my brother bought it me for what would have been my eleventh birthday in 1989. Having owned it at such an impressionable age, the album resonates with me probably more than it should. I used to think the world of it, now I just hear a big mess – although that’s probably just Prince, isn’t it?

One thing’s for certain – this soundtrack is so ingrained with the style of Tim Burton, I can’t really imagine the film without it. Strangely, it fits perfectly with Danny Elfman’s score too. Imagine Prince’s soundtrack over Christopher Nolan’s first Batman film, Batman Begins – it just doesn’t fit. As much as I love the Nolan trilogy – there’s not a great deal of humour in them, so you can’t exactly imagine something like Partyman playing out over scenes of Heath Ledger as the Joker.

The messiest song on the album is definitely Batdance, yet I loved every second of this when it was released. To my eleven year old ears, it just sounded so unworldly. Try watching the music video of it on YouTube now, it’s just horrible. Man, I didn’t have a great deal of taste when I was eleven (some would say I still don’t).

The bad thing about the Nolan trilogy being so good is that it makes the Tim Burton films look so weak in comparison. It’s an unfair comparison though. That first Burton film was the first decent superhero film in a long time, possible since Superman II – that’s a staggering nine years. These days, there seems to be nine superhero movies every year – calm down Kevin Fiege, it should be about quality, not quantity…

Hit: Partyman

Hidden Gem: Trust

Rocks In The Attic #159: Danny Elfman – ‘Batman (O.S.T.)’ (1989)

This is a very busy score – but then again so is everything that Danny Elfman does. His theme for The Simpsons is all over the place, and there’s not really a better composer suited to score the madness that Tim Burton injects into his films.

I’ve never been a big Tim Burton fan – early on I spotted his inability to create a truly three-dimensional world. Beetlejuice made me laugh, but Edward Scissorhands left me feeling cold, and I’ve felt that way ever since about most of the stuff he churns out. 1989’s Batman however, is another matter.

I was very much into Batman at the time it was released, having just got back from a holiday in the USA where I had started to read comic books. So I eagerly awaited the release of the film, and I even remember going to see it on opening night, probably with my Dad. Since Superman II, there hadn’t really been a decent superhero film, so I literally couldn’t wait to see this. My impatience was demostrated by the fact that I read the graphic novel of the film, before I watched the film itself – a huge mistake I learned to never make again.

In hindsight, it isn’t a fantastic film – especially now that Christopher Nolan has shown how a Batman film should be made – but I still have fond memories of it. Part of the nostalgia I have for the film, is the music, which proved that a superhero score could be composed by somebody other than John Williams. The Batman Theme is great, and although it’s nowhere near as majestic as Williams’ Superman Theme, it seems to suit Batman as it’s darker, moodier, and more fitting to the whole Dark Knight ethos.

This score is a perfect companion piece to Prince’s Batman soundtrack (which I also have on vinyl). Where this is dark and full of shadows, Prince’s offering is more light-hearted and almost futuristic in its sound. Let’s broaden our minds…

Hit: The Batman Theme

Hidden Gem: Descent Into Mystery

Rocks In The Attic #87: Prince & The Revolution – ‘Purple Rain (O.S.T.)’ (1984)

Rocks In The Attic #87: Prince & The Revolution - ‘Purple Rain (O.S.T.)’ (1984)I recently wrote that of all the soundtracks in my vinyl collection, Air America is the film I know the least as I’ve only seen it once. That’s actually incorrect – I’ve never seen Purple Rain.

I don’t know where I stand on Prince. People say he’s a genius, but I don’t really see it. Although, maybe I haven’t heard his genius work – I only own this and 1989’s Batman soundtrack. I’d go and see him play live if I got the opportunity, just on the reputation of his touring band, but in general I don’t think I’m in on the joke.

Hit: Purple Rain

Hidden Gem: I Would Die 4 U