Rocks In The Attic #813: Super Furry Animals – ‘Guerrilla’ (1999)

RITA#813Blimey, has it been twenty years already? Give it another twenty years and maybe an elderly Giles Martin will be doing a full remix at Abbey Road. Or not. I doubt the Super Furries would be interested in such an establishment move, but their record company might.

Released in 1999, the year I finished university, Guerrilla is the third studio album by the Welsh band. That year also marks the first time I saw the band play live, on the Other Stage at my first trip to Glastonbury. And what a show. Touring to support this album, they encored with a freak-out version of the Steely Dan-sampling The Man Don’t Give A Fuck, a crazy guy drove his van into the middle of the audience, and some Mr. T-looking motherfucker stood on top of it, throwing off anybody that dared to climb aboard.

RITA#813aI used to DJ with this record a lot, so my lovely original pressing looks like it has seen better days. Northern Lites, in particular, used to go down very well at Oldham’s 38 Bar, although I’m not sure why I used to take the record out with me when I had the 7” of that single. Do Or Die used to get a good play as well so maybe that was why, as that single didn’t come out for another seven months after the album. This album sounds like Saturday nights to me, and makes me think of some other great singles released in the same year – Sexx Laws and Mixed Bizness by Beck, Sometimes by Les Rythmes Digitales, Sunburn by Muse, and Pumping On Your Stereo and Moving by Supergrass – all of which would be staples of my set.

Deliberately conceived by the band as a commercial-pop album, Guerrilla definitely sounds more focused than their first two albums. I prefer it to Fuzzy Logic and Radiator but I’ll always lean more towards Mwng and Rings Around The World as the band’s peak. The album’s lead single Northern Lites is its centrepiece and the song’s commercial sheen took it to #11 in the UK charts (the album fared slightly better, reaching #10). Fire In My Heart definitely sounds like the band trying to be taken seriously, but the ballad only reached #25. Third single Do Or Die hit #20, but by then the momentum of the album had been lost.

RITA#813bI remember reading in the NME that the working title of one of the band’s later albums, Rings Around The World, was ‘Text Messaging Is Destroying The Pub Quiz As We Know It’. Sadly that’s not true – the NME journalist saw it written on an ‘ideas wall’ in the band’s recording studio but the band deny that it was ever considered for an album title. It wouldn’t have been too hard to imagine such a song though; Guerrilla features the band’s ode to cell-phone technology in Wherever I Lay My Phone (That’s My Home). That song ends with the once ubiquitous cell-phone interference which sadly you don’t hear too often these days.

Cut at 45rpm over two discs, the album also features the now standard artwork by Pete Fowler, including a pop-up gatefold sleeve depicting a man facing a bank of controls (possibly connected to the giant satellite dish on the sleeve’s rear cover). The album has just been reissued, and so I’m guessing Rings Around The World will be next in 2021, with Mwng already being reissued back in 2015.

Hit: Northern Lites

Hidden Gem: Some Things Come From Nothing

RITA#813c

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