Rocks In The Attic #538: Jack White – ‘Acoustic Recordings 1998-2016’ (2016)

rita538Does the world need a collection of Jack White’s acoustic recordings? I’m not sure. The whole concept of a compilation album seems to be everything White stands against. It’s music for product. Remember, this is the guy who – in the early days of the White Stripes – never told the press anything truthful because he wanted to remain enigmatic.

Acoustic Recordings 1998-2016 is a double-LP collection of White’s acoustic-leaning songs with the White Stripes, the Raconteurs, and assorted solo recordings. The real gems are the rarer songs taken from b-sides or soundtracks, and these leave you wanting more. I’d kill for an album worth of b-sides and unreleased material – a White Stripes Past Masters next please, Third Man Records.

The real gem of the album is City Lights, a previously unreleased leftover track from Get Behind Me Satan. Previous White Stripes collaborator Michel Gondry surprised White by filming a lovely little music video for the song, and only notified White’s Third Man records when it was completed.

At least it’s not just a straightforward ‘Best Of The White Stripes’ compilation. That really would be a little too hard to stomach. But we do get something almost as mawkish – a cover photo of him looking all moody, in monochrome of course. He looks like a handsome balladeer, and his mournful good looks probably wouldn’t look out of place next to this Christmas’ undoubtable Michael Bublé release.

The liner notes, by Greil Marcus – who else? – paints a picture of Jack White as the next in a long line of Delta blues guitarists, passing the torch down from the likes of Son House, Mississippi John Hurt and Skip James. Hmm…maybe…you think. But then you read the song credits and notice that White wrote one of the songs specifically for a Coca Cola commercial in 2006. Hmm…maybe not then.

Still, Jack White means a lot to me and always will. He was a key component in the shift back to the roots of rock music. After grunge, alternative rock became stagnant with nowhere to go, but then a couple of players – most notably the White Stripes and the Strokes – seemed to reset the dial.  They brought analogue recording back into the mainstream, and shorter, sharper running times of records; thirty minutes rather than the CD-bursting 50- or 60-minute snoozefests.

But I still can’t get over the fact that a compilation record just feels wrong for White…

Hit: Hotel Yorba

Hidden Gem: City Lights

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