Monthly Archives: December 2014

Rocks In The Attic #356: S’Express – ‘Original Soundtrack’ (1989)

RITA#356“Drop that ghetto blaster!” Not sure how I managed to acquire this record, but it’s a guilty pleasure nevertheless. I don’t know what it is about early sampling, but it feels right – maybe because you can hear them stop and start. Obviously everything is sampled these days in electronic music, but you can’t hear the joins any more. Listening to S’Express is like watching Ray Harryhausen’s stop-motion effects compared to the super-slick digital effects of today’s blockbusters.

I didn’t like this type of music when it came out – I was into Michael Jackson, Huey Lewis & The News, and, specifically in 1989, Prince’s Batman soundtrack. I turned 11 in 1989, and so I missed the boat on this and the acid house movement in Manchester. Damn, so close to a major musical breeding ground and I missed out on it by 5 or 6 years.

That might have been a blessing in disguise. By the time I was heavily into music – at the expense of everything else – the focus of the world of music was no longer on Manchester, but Seattle. All things considered, I’m glad I grew up with a guitar around my neck than a pair of headphones.

Hit: Theme From S’Express

Hidden Gem: Hey Music Lover

Rocks In The Attic #355: The Beatles – ‘With The Beatles’ (1963)

RITA#355Of the three Beatles records with a 60/40 split between originals and covers, this one has to be my favourite. I’m not too fond of some of the covers on Please Please Me and Beatles For Sale. The latter album always feels rushed – which it was – although you can hear how strong their original material was becoming on that record. With The Beatles gets the balance just right.

At this point, they’re still very much a band with everything to prove. They’d soon be on the crest of a wave, but here they’re still paddling their hardest to get there. In an opener like It Won’t Be Long, you can see how the world fell in love with their optimism. Post-war austerity’s days were numbered. There’s a section in the Beatles Anthology TV series where It Won’t Be Long is used to soundtrack some footage of the band on a British seaside holiday. They’re all wearing old-style bathing suits, and having a blast of a time. It was probably one of the last holidays where they could live a relatively normal life without being mobbed.

One of my main gripes about their first record is that some of the covers seem to be a little on the soft side – worlds apart from the leather-clad rockers they started as. Still, one of my favourite songs on this second album is Till There Was You­ – not only a cover, but one of the soppiest love ballads you’re ever likely to hear. I think by this time though, they’re making everything they touch their own thing. It seems so perfect for McCartney, he might as well have written it. Six months later with the soundtrack to A Hard Day’s Night he had the mastered the process with And I Love Her. Silly Love Songs was only just around the corner.

Of course, the really amusing thing about this record is that they made Ringo out to look like a midget on the cover…

Hit: All My Loving

Hidden Gem: Till There Was You

Rocks In The Attic #354: John Barry – ‘You Only Live Twice (O.S.T.)’ (1967)

RITA#354I recently heard the news that the next Bond film – #24 in the official series – is to be titled SPECTRE.  I couldn’t be happier about this. Skyfall was such a crushing disappointment for me – I could write a blog post on just that alone – but suffice to say, there were several moments in the cinema that I covered my eyes, groaned aloud and tried to hide behind my wife’s shoulder. I haven’t seen the film since and I don’t have any plans to. It broke what could have been an untouchable run for the Daniel Craig years.

Titling the next film SPECTRE is a truly wonderful thing for a Bond fan to hear. Due to copyright issues, the name of the crime organisation has been off-bounds in the official films since Diamonds Are Forever. They turn up in 1983’s unofficial Never Say Never Again, but they don’t appear in any of the official films in Roger Moore’s, Timothy Dalton’s or Pierce Brosnan’s tenure.

SPECTRE is therefore a sole hallmark of the Connery films. The legal issues have now been resolved and the crime syndicate will be making a reappearance in the 21st century. This is a great fit with the Daniel Craig films returning to the gritty feel of the early Bonds. Other news like the casting of Cristoph Waltz, Léa Seydoux, Monica Bellucci just make it sound even better. Monica Bellucci as a Bond girl? Not since Lana Wood’s role as Plenty O’Toole in Diamonds Are Forever have we seen a Bond Girl with – ahem – assets of that size.

You Only Live Twice really scared me growing up. Watching Bond “die” in the opening sequence was really confusing to a five year old. That sort of misdirection just doesn’t make sense to somebody that young. I guess it would be the same for kids these days seeing Bond “die” in the opening sequence of Skyfall.

You Only Live Twice is the last truly serious Connery Bond film. By the time he reappeared in the role four years later, the films had started down the slippery slope of high camp. Diamonds Are Forever has a great opening sequence – where Connery’s Bond is out for revenge – but this is at odds with the tone of the rest of the film.

Hopefully SPECTRE will live up to the legacy of those first five Connery films. Please, please, please…

Hit: You Only Live Twice

Hidden Gem: Capsule In Space