Rocks In The Attic #263: Thin Lizzy – ‘Live And Dangerous’ (1978)

RITA#263One of my favourite live albums, and a great opportunity to write about the time I saw Thin Lizzy play live.

When I first found rock music and the guitar in my early teens, I very quickly found Thin Lizzy – a perfect and oft overlooked meld of the two. I can remember hearing the riff from Jailbreak for the first time, and it blew my mind. It sounded so wrong and yet so right. They seemed to come along at just the right time for me that I was confident enough on the guitar to pick things up by ear, so by listening to their records, and with a little help from my guitar teacher Dave Taylor – who was a huge Lizzy fan – I found I could play most of their stuff pretty easily.

I first met Dave when he used to come into our sixth form college and give group guitar lessons. It was always amusing to see what level of hangover he would have when he walked in every Wednesday morning. I have a permanent vision of him walking in, wearing sunglasses and looking very unkempt in a green and yellow polo shirt. I then had private lessons for a couple of years, but when I went to University, the distance between us meant that I stopped having lessons and drifted out of touch. Over those three years, he went from giving guitar lessons in a room in his house to buying a section of a mill in Oldham and installing rehearsal rooms and a recording studio.

I would eventually use these rehearsal rooms with my first regular gigging band, Delta 7, but another band would use them in the interim. Thin fucking Lizzy!

I don’t know how Dave made the connections with the band but in 1996, various former members of Thin Lizzy decided to get back together and start touring again. Guitarist John Sykes took vocal duties, with guitarist Scott Gorham, drummer Brian Downey and keyboard player Darren Wharton joining the reunion. The only non-member of the band was Marco Mendoza, who played bass.

Not only did they use Dave’s studio, but they chose the most inauspicious venues in the whole world – Oldham’s Queen Elizabeth Hall – as the location for the first show. Seeing Thin Lizzy play without Phil Lynott may sound like sacrilege, but they were awesome and after the opening bombast of Jailbreak, Sykes took the opportunity to dedicate the whole show to Lynnott. Critics can say what they want, but it was Lizzy up there, and I love the band so much I’d be the first person to admit it if they didn’t deserve the use of the name.

This was probably one of the best gigs I’ve ever seen – one of my favourite bands, reforming for the first time since their leader’s untimely death, rehearsing in my guitar teacher’s rehearsal rooms and playing for the first time in a local venue more famous for wedding receptions and tea-dances. I even bought a t-shirt from the merch stall which was manned by Dave’s wife and daughter (not the same person by the way – as far as I know, Oldham doesn’t suffer from inbreeding, just a bad gene pool).

I like to think that if I hadn’t gone to University when I did, and continued to see Dave for guitar lessons, I might have had some involvement in the show – I’d have happily been a roadie if it meant the honour of carrying Scott Gorham’s guitar amp.

Live And Dangerous is a great live album, capturing Lizzy on the road at their peak (and featuring an appearance by a pre-‘& The News’ Huey Lewis on harmonica on one track). The album does sound slightly over-polished though, and band members over the years have admitted to recording overdubs on some of the songs. While producer Tony Visconti claims that the album is only ‘75% recorded in the studio’, band members have claimed that it is ‘75% live’. It’s disappointing either way, and makes me suspicious of all other albums that claim to be recorded live.

Hit: The Boys Are Back In Town

Hidden Gem: Massacre

1 thought on “Rocks In The Attic #263: Thin Lizzy – ‘Live And Dangerous’ (1978)

  1. Pingback: Rocks In The Attic #582: Bob Seger & The Silver Bullet Band – ‘The Distance’ (1982) | Vinyl Stylus

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