Rocks In The Attic #247: Frankie Goes To Hollywood – ‘Welcome To The Pleasuredome’ (1984)

RITA#247Frankie Goes To Hollywood was a favourite band of my brother’s when I was growing up, and at the time I was a little too young to appreciate them. I think this copy of the album – the original double vinyl edition – is actually my brother’s original copy, and from seeing it around a lot during my childhood, it slowly became part of my collection.

I’m not 100% sure if I like the band, or if they truly are just style and no substance, but they seem a much better prospect than the likes of ‘80s dirgefests like Wham or Madonna. I’m also unsure as to whether the band can really play or whether Trevor Horn’s production just makes them sound very good. It’s rumoured he replaced their tracks with those of session musicians anyway, so who knows.

It might sound strange but I have great difficulty in believing that the band is from Liverpool. I don’t know if it’s the fact that they’re so ‘art rock’ (which, when we’re talking about music from the UK, I would always associate with London bands), or whether it’s simply because Holly Johnson’s raspy vocals hold no trace whatsoever of a scouse accent, but I’d never pick that city as their hometown if I didn’t know better.

Say whatever you want about this band, but you have to respect their ability to provoke. Being banned from the BBC is a great thing for a band to be, and looking back it always makes the BBC look pathetic and outdated. The whole package of the album is a treat, with a Picasso-esque cubist painting of the band on the front, and enough liner notes to fill a small book. Their posturing makes them come across as an earlier, poppier version of Manic Street Preachers, and quoting the likes of Kierkegaard and Baudelaire adds to this.

I’m not too sure about the very ‘80s merchandise listings that adorn one of the inner sleeves. An advert declaring £8.99 for a pair of ‘Jean Genet’ boxer shorts really looks out of place on a pop record, but I guess the band are making a point about the similarity between music and consumerism (while making a few bucks on the side…).

Hit: Two Tribes

Hidden Gem: Born To Run

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3 thoughts on “Rocks In The Attic #247: Frankie Goes To Hollywood – ‘Welcome To The Pleasuredome’ (1984)

  1. Matthew Gibson

    The Liverpool music scene of the early 80s was very arty – OMD, Teardrop Explodes, the Mighty Wah, even Echo & the Bunnymen. Very up its own arse too though. Same with the Manchester scene. It’s the bands who weren’t pompous that stand the test of time. Which is why no-one listens to OMD or ACR these days.

    Is Born to Run a cover of Springsteen? It’s a serious question, but I assume the answer is no.

    Reply
  2. Pingback: Rocks In The Attic #567: ABC – ‘The Lexicon Of Love’ (1982) | Vinyl Stylus

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