Rocks In The Attic #197: R.E.M. – ‘Automatic For The People’ (1992)

RITA#197This was one of the first CDs I ever bought. In fact, it might have been only the second or third such purchase. As soon as I started listening to music obsessively, I joined one of those music mail-order clubs, where you choose a stack of CDs for a really low price, and then they try and send you the latest new release every month. Automatic For The People was in that first stack of CDs I bought from them. I thought then, as I do now, that it’s a perfect album. There’s nothing about it that I dislike, and it’s remained a firm favourite ever since.

R.E.M. fans will have you believe that their earlier albums are where it’s at, but for me, everything they ever did in their formative years leads to this album, and everything they did afterwards was just a steady downhill decline. If somebody was foolish enough to say that Murmur or Reckoning was a better album than this, I’d just laugh in their stupid face. There’s a horrible trend for musos to instantly dislike an album as soon as it’s crossed over into the mainstream and achieved a certain level of acclaim. I’m probably guilty of having done this from time to time. To dismiss this album in that fashion though would be a real mistake for anybody to make.

I’ve listened to this album on a couple of road trips, and it seems to attain something different when you listen to it while travelling. I’m not exactly sure what it is, but I think the mood of the album seems to make more sense. R.E.M. are a very American band – they deal in Americana – sometimes to the detriment to their reputation outside their native country, to people who might not necessarily always ‘get’ them; but I think the universal themes of the album – loss, regret and longing – seem to connect better somehow on the road.

Hit: Everybody Hurts

Hidden Gem: Drive

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2 thoughts on “Rocks In The Attic #197: R.E.M. – ‘Automatic For The People’ (1992)

  1. Matthew Gibson

    I think you’re being harsh on us Reckoning fans. It’s a fantastic album and I don’t think it’s stupid to call it REM’s best. I like it better than Automatic… but I’d argue that the difference in quality is so small as to be meaningless.

    Reply
  2. Pingback: Rocks In The Attic #478: R.E.M. – ‘Unplugged 1991’ (2014) | Vinyl Stylus

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