Rocks In The Attic #154: Elvis Costello – ‘The Man – The Best Of Elvis Costello’ (1986)

I’ve never really been able to figure out Elvis Costello. On the one hand, he’s a fantastic songwriter, but I think I have a problem in that he doesn’t fit into one genre of music – he moves around so much that it’s impossible to pigeon-hole him.

I know his stuff more through other band’s covers of his material – Pump It Up, especially – rather than his own recordings. Listening to these songs back-to-back, I think his voice puts me off him more than anything else – he slurs his lyrics in the same way that Buddy Holly hiccups his. They look like they share the same optician too.

I can take him or leave this Elvis – and I get the impression that like a lot of London acts, he’s far more relevant to southerners rather than grim northerners like myself.

Hit: Oliver’s Army

Hidden Gem: Pump It Up

3 thoughts on “Rocks In The Attic #154: Elvis Costello – ‘The Man – The Best Of Elvis Costello’ (1986)

  1. Matthew Gibson

    He’s just nowhere near as good as he’s made out to be. An average journeyman somehow granted the status of genius. Yes, he’s done some great songs – Shipbuilding is one you didn’t mention. But then, they’re not actually that good after you listen a while. And I agree about the voice.

    Reply
  2. Matthew Gibson

    He’s very overrated. A journeyman somehow granted the status of genius. Yes, he’s done some great songs – Shipbuilding is one you didn’t mention. But there aren’t many good songs, and when you listen to them a few tines, they’re not even that great. I agree about the voice too.
    (I might have written two slightly different versions of this comment…)

    Reply

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